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Vegetables that aren’t as healthy as you think

You know you should eat more vegetables. We all do. If you’re one of the millions of people who are trying to live better, chances are you make a conscious effort to forego sweets and fast food for the occasional salad or green smoothie — because vegetables, no matter which ones, are always healthy, right?

“It is always better to choose a fruit or vegetable over processed food in a snap decision,” Dr. Konda Reddy of Physicians Weight Loss Orlando, told me in an interview. But, the truth is, not all vegetables are created equal. Here are some vegetables that aren’t as healthy as you think.

If you’re anything like me, corn probably ranks high on your list of favorite vegetables. From grilled corn on the cob to sweet corn salad, these little morsels of yellow goodness taste delicious no matter how you prepare them. And because they’re a vegetable, I always feel a little when I choose to forego French fries to nosh away at some corn instead. Unfortunately, most nutritional experts I spoke to weren’t as big of fans of corn as I hoped.

“Vegetables like corn are higher in carbohydrates, and the carbohydrates contained inside these veggies are not mostly indigestible fiber, but rather, strings of sugar also known as starches,” registered dietician Catherine Metzgar, Ph.D. told me in an interview. “These starches are very digestible and are quickly converted into sugar in your body, raising your blood sugar.”

 

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Featured Shop: Best deal in September

The Apple Watch and Microsoft Band use optical sensors to measure heart rate. The Jawbone Up3, which instead tracks your resting heart rate,  uses bioimpedance sensors and several electrodes to measure your skin’s resistance to a small amount of electrical current.

Originally, all photography was monochrome, or black-and-white. Even after color film was readily available, black-and-white photography continued to dominate for decades, due to its lower cost.

The Apple Watch and Microsoft Band use optical sensors to measure heart rate. The Jawbone Up3, which instead tracks your resting heart rate,  uses bioimpedance sensors and several electrodes to measure your skin’s resistance to a small amount of electrical current.

The Apple Watch and Microsoft Band use optical sensors to measure heart rate. The Jawbone Up3, which instead tracks your resting heart rate,  uses bioimpedance sensors and several electrodes to measure your skin’s resistance to a small amount of electrical current.

Chasing the blonde dragon is still a genuine plight, because the grass is always

There’s a misguided notion that natural beauty products just don’t do the job as well as conventional creams and cleansers. While that may be the case for some, I’ve found that many natural products are even better than the drugstore brands. Case in point: Mullein and Sparro.

greener on the other side, i.e., the other end of the hair color spectrum. And while Sun-In may not be the answer — not even the fair-haired who are just out for some highlights are immune to the moisture zapping.

There’s a misguided notion that natural beauty products just don’t do the job

 

Bici elettriche: boom di vendite nel 2016

There’s a misguided notion that natural beauty products just don’t do the job as well as conventional creams and cleansers. While that may be the case for some, I’ve found that many natural products are even better than the drugstore brands. Case in point: Mullein and Sparro.

There’s a misguided notion that natural beauty products just don’t do the job as well as conventional creams and cleansers. While that may be the case for some, I’ve found that many natural products are even better than the drugstore brands. Case in point: Mullein and Sparro. greener on the other side, i.e., the other end of the hair color spectrum. And while Sun-In may not be the answer — not even the fair-haired who are just out for some highlights are immune to the moisture zapping.

There’s a misguided notion that natural beauty products just don’t do the job as well as conventional creams and cleansers. While that may be the case for some, I’ve found that many natural products are even better than the drugstore brands. Case in point: Mullein and S

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Post Format: Quote

The temperature in your bedroom is perfect. Your blackout curtains have been drawn shut. And you’ve just finished a cup of chamomile tea and novel that made you laugh out loud and forget about whatever was bothering you earlier in the day.

You’re just about ready to drift off, and suddenly the air conditioner kicks on. Or a car alarm screeches through the night air. Or your partner sneezes. Suddenly, you’re wide-awake again. Your brain responds to noises when you’re awake and asleep. But if the interruptions wake you up, that can keep you from getting the restful shuteye that you need.

When ambient noise is disrupting your sleep, white (or pink) noise can help to smooth out the rough edges. Imagine sitting next to a person who is loudly chewing gum in a library. Then imagine sitting next to that same person in a crowded bar. It’s the same chomping gum, but underneath the drone of a crowded place, you can’t even hear it anymore. White noise, whether it’s from a sound machine, a simple fan, or crowd noise helps to mask noise-related disruptions by creating a constant ambient sound that makes a “peak” noise, like a door slamming, less of a contrast. And that makes you less likely to be startled awake.

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The untold truth of Oreos

Have you ever wondered where the concept for Oreo cookies came from, or why they’ve reached an almost cult-like status? With more than 450 billion Oreo cookies sold since their inception in 1912, it’s safe to say they’ve earned the “America’s Favorite Cookie” moniker.

But, it’s not just the US who prefers to twist, lick, and dunk their cookies. Oreo cookies can be found in 100 countries worldwide and is the best-selling cookie brand of the 21st century. Pour yourself a glass of ice-cold milk and digest some “Wonderfilled” facts about this iconic sandwich cookie.

The Oreo cookie has gone through some name changes over the past 105 years. When they were first introduced in 1912, they were known simply as the Oreo Biscuit (we’ll get to why a bit later). Then in 1921, the cookie embraced its shape and was renamed the Oreo Sandwich. In 1937, the name was changed again. This time they took a high-brow turn and assumed the name, Oreo Crème Sandwich. Well, they certainly sound fancier, right? The final name change (for now) came in 1974 when the cookie became known as the Oreo Chocolate Sandwich Cookie, Oreo for short.

The scattering of name changes isn’t the only inconsistency with the iconic brand. The rumors surrounding the actual name are also a jumble. According to a Time article, it’s possible the name Oreo came from “or” the French word for gold, and coincidentally the original package color

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Will a Sound Machine Help You Drift Off?

The temperature in your bedroom is perfect. Your blackout curtains have been drawn shut. And you’ve just finished a cup of chamomile tea and novel that made you laugh out loud and forget about whatever was bothering you earlier in the day.

You’re just about ready to drift off, and suddenly the air conditioner kicks on. Or a car alarm screeches through the night air. Or your partner sneezes. Suddenly, you’re wide-awake again. Your brain responds to noises when you’re awake and asleep. But if the interruptions wake you up, that can keep you from getting the restful shuteye that you need.

When ambient noise is disrupting your sleep, white (or pink) noise can help to smooth out the rough edges. Imagine sitting next to a person who is loudly chewing gum in a library. Then imagine sitting next to that same person in a crowded bar. It’s the same chomping gum, but underneath the drone of a crowded place, you can’t even hear it anymore. White noise, whether it’s from a sound machine, a simple fan, or crowd noise helps to mask noise-related disruptions by creating a constant ambient sound that makes a “peak” noise, like a door slamming, less of a contrast. And that makes you less likely to be startled awake.

Read more...

Post Format: Youtube

The temperature in your bedroom is perfect. Your blackout curtains have been drawn shut. And you’ve just finished a cup of chamomile tea and novel that made you laugh out loud and forget about whatever was bothering you earlier in the day.

You’re just about ready to drift off, and suddenly the air conditioner kicks on. Or a car alarm screeches through the night air. Or your partner sneezes. Suddenly, you’re wide-awake again. Your brain responds to noises when you’re awake and asleep. But if the interruptions wake you up, that can keep you from getting the restful shuteye that you need.

When ambient noise is disrupting your sleep, white (or pink) noise can help to smooth out the rough edges. Imagine sitting next to a person who is loudly chewing gum in a library. Then imagine sitting next to that same person in a crowded bar. It’s the same chomping gum, but underneath the drone of a crowded place, you can’t even hear it anymore. White noise, whether it’s from a sound machine, a simple fan, or crowd noise helps to mask noise-related disruptions by creating a constant ambient sound that makes a “peak” noise, like a door slamming, less of a contrast. And that makes you less likely to be startled awake.

Read more...

Post Format: Audio

The temperature in your bedroom is perfect. Your blackout curtains have been drawn shut. And you’ve just finished a cup of chamomile tea and novel that made you laugh out loud and forget about whatever was bothering you earlier in the day.

You’re just about ready to drift off, and suddenly the air conditioner kicks on. Or a car alarm screeches through the night air. Or your partner sneezes. Suddenly, you’re wide-awake again. Your brain responds to noises when you’re awake and asleep. But if the interruptions wake you up, that can keep you from getting the restful shuteye that you need.

When ambient noise is disrupting your sleep, white (or pink) noise can help to smooth out the rough edges. Imagine sitting next to a person who is loudly chewing gum in a library. Then imagine sitting next to that same person in a crowded bar. It’s the same chomping gum, but underneath the drone of a crowded place, you can’t even hear it anymore. White noise, whether it’s from a sound machine, a simple fan, or crowd noise helps to mask noise-related disruptions by creating a constant ambient sound that makes a “peak” noise, like a door slamming, less of a contrast. And that makes you less likely to be startled awake.

Read more...

Post Format: Gallery

The temperature in your bedroom is perfect. Your blackout curtains have been drawn shut. And you’ve just finished a cup of chamomile tea and novel that made you laugh out loud and forget about whatever was bothering you earlier in the day.

You’re just about ready to drift off, and suddenly the air conditioner kicks on. Or a car alarm screeches through the night air. Or your partner sneezes. Suddenly, you’re wide-awake again. Your brain responds to noises when you’re awake and asleep. But if the interruptions wake you up, that can keep you from getting the restful shuteye that you need.

When ambient noise is disrupting your sleep, white (or pink) noise can help to smooth out the rough edges. Imagine sitting next to a person who is loudly chewing gum in a library. Then imagine sitting next to that same person in a crowded bar. It’s the same chomping gum, but underneath the drone of a crowded place, you can’t even hear it anymore. White noise, whether it’s from a sound machine, a simple fan, or crowd noise helps to mask noise-related disruptions by creating a constant ambient sound that makes a “peak” noise, like a door slamming, less of a contrast. And that makes you less likely to be startled awake.

Read more...

Post Format: Vimeo

The temperature in your bedroom is perfect. Your blackout curtains have been drawn shut. And you’ve just finished a cup of chamomile tea and novel that made you laugh out loud and forget about whatever was bothering you earlier in the day.

You’re just about ready to drift off, and suddenly the air conditioner kicks on. Or a car alarm screeches through the night air. Or your partner sneezes. Suddenly, you’re wide-awake again. Your brain responds to noises when you’re awake and asleep. But if the interruptions wake you up, that can keep you from getting the restful shuteye that you need.

When ambient noise is disrupting your sleep, white (or pink) noise can help to smooth out the rough edges. Imagine sitting next to a person who is loudly chewing gum in a library. Then imagine sitting next to that same person in a crowded bar. It’s the same chomping gum, but underneath the drone of a crowded place, you can’t even hear it anymore. White noise, whether it’s from a sound machine, a simple fan, or crowd noise helps to mask noise-related disruptions by creating a constant ambient sound that makes a “peak” noise, like a door slamming, less of a contrast. And that makes you less likely to be startled awake.

Read more...

The untold truth of Ina Garten

Ina Garten, aka The Barefoot Contessa, is the picture of effortless elegance. Watching her show, her home always looks warm and inviting. She lives life to the fullest, and it’s hard to tell which she loves more… cooking or her husband Jeffrey.

However, her life has not always been decadent meals and impressive dinner parties. She started out as an unfulfilled government worker before making the leap to the food business. She worked hard to teach herself new cooking skills and grow her following. She still doesn’t make everything perfectly and struggles with one dessert in particular. Yes, there is so much more to learn about beloved cook Ina Garten.

If Ina Garten had not taken a chance on herself and thrown herself into the world of food, you would most likely find her on her couch watching television. “I worry that if I don’t challenge myself professionally I’ll lie on the sofa and watch old episodes of Law & Order all day,” Garten told Vanity Fair. Garten does not like this quality in herself (or in anyone else), so she is constantly pushing herself and trying new things.

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